What Do Benzodiazepines Look Like?

Benzodiazepines are a class of depressant drugs used to treat anxiety, seizure disorders, and insomnia. If you are suspecting drug abuse in yourself or a loved one, you may be wondering about how to identify benzodiazepines. In this post, understand what do benzodiazepines look like, signs of addiction, and how to get help.

Last Edited:

04/18/2022

Medical Reviewer:

Dr. Andres Maldonado

Clinically Reviewed:

06/17/2021

Benzodiazepines, otherwise known as “benzos” are medications used to lower activity in the brain. Conditions such as anxiety, seizures, or insomnia are a result of increased brain activity, and some patients are given benzodiazepines to reduce overly neuro-active symptoms.

In medical settings, benzodiazepines are also used as anesthesia for surgical procedures. Since it is also a relaxant, some people with mood disorders are prescribed the drug to help alleviate symptoms. In any of these conditions, there is also a risk of benzodiazepine abuse due to its relaxing and euphoric effects.

Wondering if there is a potential benzodiazepine abuse in a loved one, or even yourself? The information below can help you identify benzodiazepines and how to get started with substance abuse recovery.

Benzodiazepines Physical Appearance

The most common brand name benzodiazepines are Valium, Klonopin, Xanax, Halcion and Ativan. Below, you would find their colors, the number of milligrams, and imprints for each brand.

What mg are benzodiazepine (different colors)?

Valium

  • 2-milligram tablet: White, round, has a “V” shaped hollow at the middle with imprints “2 Valium” and “Roche Roche”.
  • 5-milligram tablet: Yellow, round, has a “V” shaped hollow at the middle with imprints “5 Valium” and “Roche Roche”.
  • 10-milligram tablet: Blue, round, has a “V” shaped hollow at the middle with imprints “10 Valium” and “Roche Roche”.

Klonopin

  • 0.5-milligram tablet: Orange, round, has a “K” shaped hollow at the middle with imprints “½ Klonopin” and “Roche”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: Blue, round, has a “K” shaped hollow at the middle with imprints “1 Klonopin” and “Roche”.
  • 2-milligram tablet: White, round, has a “K” shaped hollow at the middle, and imprints “2 Klonopin” and “Roche”.

Xanax

  • 0.25-milligram tablet: White, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “Xanax 0.25”.
  • 0.5-milligram tablet: Orange, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “Xanax 0.5”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: Blue, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “Xanax 1.0”.
  • 2-milligram tablet: White, oblong-shaped, with 3-scored lines, and an imprint of “Xanax” and “2”.

Halcion

  • 0.25-milligram tablet: Light blue, ellipse-shaped, with an imprint of “Halcion 0.25”.

Ativan

  • 0.25-milligram tablet: White, pentagon-shaped, with an imprint of “A BPI 63”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: White, pentagon-shaped, with an imprint of “A 64 Wyeth”.
  • 1-milligram tablet (another variant): White, pentagon-shaped, with an imprint of “A BPI 64”.
  • 2-milligram tablet: White, pentagon-shaped, with an imprint of “A 2 BPI 65”.

Knowing the benzodiazepine colors and the milligrams can help you learn the right dosage and brand, especially when the medications are not in their original packaging. Aside from brand-name benzodiazepines, there are also generic variations.

What do generic benzodiazepines look like?

Diazepam

  • 2-milligram tablet: White, round, with an imprint of “Mylan 271”.
  • 5-milligram tablet: Orange, round, with an imprint of “Mylan 345”.
  • 10-milligram tablet: Green, round, with an imprint of “Mylan 477”.

Clonazepam

  • 0.5-milligram tablet: Light yellow, round, with an imprint of a V-shaped logo and  “2530”.
  • 0.5-milligram tablet (another variant): Light yellow, round, with an imprint of a G-shaped logo and “63”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: Blue, round, with an imprint of “C 1”.
  • 2-milligram tablet: White, round, with an imprint of “C 2”.

Alprazolam

  • 0.25-milligram tablet: White, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “G 3719”.
  • 0.5-milligram tablet: Orange, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “B705”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: Blue, oval-shaped, with an imprint of “B706”.

Triazolam

  • 0.125-milligram tablet: White, oval, with an imprint of “54 519”.
  • 0.25-milligram tablet: Light blue, oval, with an imprint of “54 620”.
  • 0.25-milligram tablet (another variant): Light blue, elliptical-shaped, with an imprint of “G 3718”.

Lorazepam

  • 0.5-milligram tablet: White, round, with an imprint of “EP 904”.
  • 1-milligram tablet: White, round, with an imprint of “EP 905 1”.
  • 2-milligram tablet: White, round, with an imprint of “EP 906 2”.

Now that you have a background of what color are benzodiazepines, milligrams, as well as generic and brand names, understanding the signs of substance abuse is also important to prevent dangerous side effects and health complications.

Signs of Benzodiazepine Abuse

Benzodiazepines, like opiates, are nervous system depressants. They produce effects such as reduced brain activity, resulting in the relaxation of muscles and organs. When taken in large amounts, there is also a risk of overdose which often presents itself as heart or lung distress. Thus, it is important to be aware of the signs of benzodiazepine abuse:

  • Feeling weak and lethargic
  • Increased times of sleep
  • Problems focusing and poor memory
  • Changes in weight and appearance
  • Pale skin and bluish-looking fingers and lips
  • Looking for ways to get more benzodiazepine medications (pharmacy hopping, doctor hopping, or asking friends if they have the drug)
  • Gradual changes in mood and personality
  • Lack of interest in former activities (work, school, hobbies)
  • Trouble breathing
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, fever, and mood problems when not taking benzodiazepines

If you notice any of these signs and see suspicious medications in your loved one’s belongings, it could be a potential benzodiazepine abuse issue. Seeking expert help as soon as possible can help boost chances of better addiction recovery and prevent life-threatening consequences.

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How to Get Help for Benzodiazepine Abuse

Finding help for substance abuse can seem overwhelming at first, but resources are available. You can easily get started with these concrete steps for yourself or a loved one:

Contact a benzodiazepine abuse treatment center

Finding a trusted benzodiazepine abuse treatment center can help you get in recovery with the right foot. Experts in such facilities are trained to address problems such as benzodiazepine dependency through drug detox. They can also identify factors that influence benzodiazepine abuse to craft a treatment program suited for each patient’s needs.

Find supportive loved ones to help in the process

The journey towards recovery becomes much easier with you have a supportive community to help you out. You can let trusted loved ones know about the substance abuse condition so that they can provide the support you need–whether it’s emotional, financial, or travel assistance.

Educate yourself with substance abuse

Learning more about substance abuse through informative blogs, journals, or group discussions can help refine your decisions in addiction recovery. It can also provide you with crucial information should you or a loved one experience health problems associated with addiction.

Benzodiazepines: Identifying the Drug, Signs of Abuse, and Getting Help

More than learning what do benzodiazepines look like, being aware of addiction signs and educating yourself on how to get help can help save a life. Through this comprehensive post, you can take action for yourself or a loved one to recover from benzodiazepine abuse.

Sources

  1. Mayoclinic.pure.elsevier.com – “Benzodiazepines for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders”.
  2. Dea.gov – “Benzodiazepines Drug Fact Sheet”.
  3. Drugabuse.gov – “Prescription CNS Depressants”.

Medical disclaimer:

Sunshine Behavioral Health strives to help people who are facing substance abuse, addiction, mental health disorders, or a combination of these conditions. It does this by providing compassionate care and evidence-based content that addresses health, treatment, and recovery.

Licensed medical professionals review material we publish on our site. The material is not a substitute for qualified medical diagnoses, treatment, or advice. It should not be used to replace the suggestions of your personal physician or other health care professionals.

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