Al-Anon Family Groups and Meetings in Minnesota, United States Directory

Finding free addiction treatment resources can be challenging and time-consuming. Below is a comprehensive list of free addiction treatment resources in the state of Minnesota.

How to Start Your Search for Free Treatment Resources and Programs

Given the large variety of information on the internet, it can be extremely challenging to sort through what is relevant to you and your specific treatment needs. The best way to start your search for free treatment resources and programs is by checking out the information below. 

State-Funded Programs

State-funded programs are a great option for someone who cannot financially afford to enroll in private programs. The Minnesota Department of Human Services oversees publicly funded programs based on mental health services for people who live in Minnesota and are suffering from a mental illness. Emergency services are available 24/7 for people having a psychiatric or mental health crisis. The phone number you can call if you are in a crisis and need to speak with a team of professionals who can help is **CRISIS (**274747) or you can text “MN” to 741741. If not in a crisis, you can call the DHS Information Desk at (651) 431-2000 and they will be able to assist you with finding a state-funded program that best suits your needs. 

Local Meetings

Local meetings can be a great source of support for someone working to overcome an addiction. In Minnesota, there are tons of local meetings for Alcoholics Anonymous and many other 12-step programs. 

There are also Alternative AA Support Groups in Minnesota, which can be found by clicking on the link provided. The link will take you to a list of Secular Organizations for Sobriety meetings, Health Realization meetings, Minnesota Alternative peer Support Center, All Recovery meetings, Women for Sobriety meetings, Refuge Recovery MN meetings, LifeRing meetings, and Recovery Dharma meetings. The link provides a description of the meetings, date, time, location, and contact information. 

Find Support Locally

The Minnesota Department of Human Services provides a plethora of mental health resources for people who are living in Minnesota and are suffering from a mental illness. By clicking on the link above you will be directed to adult mental health programs and services that are available in Minnesota. The website provides mental health crisis phone numbers, suicide prevention lifeline, as well as a list and contact information for many other mental health services.  

Local AA Meetings

Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) is a 12-step program for men and women who have a drinking problem, supporting each other to overcome their addiction. You can find a comprehensive list of local A.A. meetings through visiting AAMinnesota. Follow the prompts on the website by narrowing down “everywhere” to the district you live in. You can also select the day, time, and type of A.A. meeting you wish to attend. At the bottom of the website, before you select your location, a list of all the A.A. meetings in Minnesota and their times and location is displayed. Due to Covid-19, most A.A. meetings are being held online through zoom meetings.

Local NA Meetings

Narcotics Anonymous (N.A.) is a 12-step program designed to help people who are addicted to narcotic drugs stop using drugs and find new ways of living. You can find a comprehensive list of local N.A. meetings through visiting Narcotics Anonymous Minnesota Region. Follow the prompts on the website by selecting the tab labeled “find a meeting.” Then select “MN Regional Virtual Meeting List” and you will have a list of all the meetings in Minnesota, meeting days, meeting start times, meeting city, and a zoom link. Due to Covid-19, most A.A. meetings are being held online through zoom meetings.

Faith-Based Meetings

Faith-based meetings in Minnesota help those who are struggling with their addiction find relief while supporting and strengthening their faith.  

Other Options/Paid Options

Scholarships

The Minnesota Department of Human Services provides information on alcohol, drug, and other addictions grantees. Here you can find a list of open grants that are available to help you pay for your addiction recovery. 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides funding opportunities and grants to help people afford their substance abuse treatment. You can apply for one of these grants by following the prompts in the link above. 

Insurance

Medicare is a federally funded form of health insurance for people who are over 65 and or under 65 but have certain disabilities. Medicare is affordable health insurance that offers various plan options to best fit your needs. To check your eligibility and apply click on the website provided above. 

Medicaid is a state and federally funded form of health insurance for people who are pregnant, disabled, or low income. Participants pay little to nothing for coverage. To check your eligibility and apply click on the website provided above. 

Tricare is health insurance for military members and their families. Tricare covers substance use disorder treatments and is a great option for members of the military and their families to seek treatment for their addictions. 

Loans

Not all insurance policies will cover all the necessary treatment services needed for a person to recover from their addiction. One option is to take out a loan to help pay for addiction recovery. A home equity loan is a loan that uses your home as collateral. These are considered low-risk and have favorable interest rates. 

Private loans are sometimes catered specifically to those seeking finance for addiction treatment. These private companies offer affordable rates that take into account a person's treatment needs and recovery timelines. 

Personal loans are another option. Personal loans are taken directly from a person’s bank account and are based on their credit history and other assets.

12-Step programs and non-religious

Secular Alcoholics Anonymous is like the 12 step A.A. program but without the Christian aspect to it. It is an agnostic version of the traditional A.A. program. 

Cocaine Anonymous is a 12 step program for individuals wishing to overcome their cocaine addiction. Follow the prompts on the website to find local C.A. meetings near you. Due to Covid-19 zoom meetings are available every Friday at 6:30. The link above will also provide information on the zoom meetings password and meeting ID. 

Dual Recovery Anonymous is a 12 step program to help people manage their dual diagnosis. The goal is to help those who are experiencing dual illnesses. This program is for people who are chemically dependent and suffering from emotional or psychiatric illness. It helps them recover from both their substance abuse and emotional or psychiatric illness by focusing on relapse prevention and improving their quality of life. 

Smart Recovery is an alternative to 12-step programs. This program uses cognitive therapy to change behaviors that trigger substance abuse. Click on the link above to find a program in your area. 

Friends and family

Thrive! Family Support is a support group for those who have family members who are struggling with substance abuse. It is a local program in Minnesota that provides resources, support, education, advocacy, and healing connections to family members. 

Al-Anon is a group for family and friends of alcoholics to help them recover from the effects of living with a loved one who has a drinking problem. The link provided above will take you to a list of local meetings in the state of Minnesota. 

Nar-anon is a meeting for friends and family of addicts and recovering addicts. If you click on the link provided it will take you to their website where you can type in your location and it will populate local Nar-anon meetings. 

Families Anonymous is a 12 step fellowship program for the family and friends of individuals with drug or alcohol issues. To find a location near you click on the link provided. 

Recovery Advice When Money Is Scarce

Even if you are low on money, recovering from your drug addiction should be a priority. A lot of the 12 step programs that you can attend to aid in your recovery are volunteer lead and should be free. Many health insurance policies will cover some of your addiction treatment because the Affordable Care Act (ACA) lists addiction as one of the 10 essential health benefits that are required to be covered similarly to other medical and surgical needs. Also, friends and family can be a source to borrow money from if you are having difficulty getting a loan or insurance is not covering enough. 

Online Self-Help Forums

Smart Recovery Online (SROL) is an online community that offers daily online meetings, message boards, and a 24/7 live chat to help people overcome addiction. You can see a list of online meetings and register to attend them by clicking on the link above and following the prompts.

Self Recovery is a private online addiction recovery program. This is a great option for those who have hectic schedules, family obligations, tight budgets, and fear judgment from others. This program enables the user to explore the causes of their addiction. You can enroll in their classes by clicking on the link above and following the prompts. 

Life Process Program is an online recovery service for drug and alcohol addiction. The program is an alternative to AA and other 12-step programs. It is self-paced and puts you in control of your recovery. This program is broken down into 8 online modules that consist of video files, reading materials, and exercises relevant to the topic of that module. You can register for this program by clicking on the link above and following the prompts. 

References 

Alcoholism affects many people, not just the people who are doing the actual drinking. In fact, family members and friends of heavy drinkers may suffer greatly from the effects of alcohol.

Al-Anon and Alateen groups recognize the suffering of loved ones. The groups teach people about alcoholism and help them understand that they need and deserve help as well.

What Are Al-Anon and Alateen?

Al-Anon and Alateen are organizations that aim to help relatives, friends, coworkers, and others affected by the drinking of people they know. Al-Anon meetings are open to everyone, while Alateen meetings are for teenagers (and occasionally preteens). Collectively, the meetings are known as Al-Anon Family Groups (AFG).

Both groups are related to organizations such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and other groups that help people who have struggled with addictions to alcohol or drugs or with compulsive behaviors.

Al-Anon, Alateen, and AA, in common with other addiction-related groups:

- Encourage members to meet with each other to provide support.

- Ask their members to work through a series of 12 steps to acknowledge their problems with alcohol, drugs, or behaviors; admit their mistakes; and make efforts to change.

- Use 12 traditions to guide individuals and the organization.

- Allow new members to ask veteran members to serve as sponsors to provide more personalized support.

- Respect the anonymity of their members.

- Publish literature that informs people about addiction and addiction-related issues.

- Operate under the guidelines of the World Service Conference to manage the organizations and provide access for their members.

- Offer their services for free, although they accept donations.

Do Al-Anon and Alateen Have Meetings?

Yes. Like AA, Al-Anon and Alateen emphasize meetings. And like other addiction-related organizations, Al-Anon and Alateen offer meetings across the United States and around the world.

In these meetings, members can gather to learn more about addiction and provide mutual support. People can share their problems and triumphs and can see that they’re not alone, that others are experiencing the same things.

In-Person Meetings

For people who want to meet face-to-face, Al-Anon and Alateen offer in-person meetings. The organizations include information on where to find such gatherings on the Al-Anon Family Groups online site.

The site also includes information about what to expect when people attend meetings and answers to some frequently asked questions (FAQs).

Virtual Meetings

Some people may prefer virtual meetings instead of face-to-face ones. They may not be able to travel to attend in-person meetings or may not have any gatherings in their geographic area.

Developments such as COVID-19 may have also closed facilities that host meetings or have made people wary of gathering in groups.

For those reasons and others, Al-Anon and Alateen support a wide variety of platforms that allow people to gather and communicate without having to leave their homes. Members of these groups can contact each other and express their thoughts by using:

- Phone calls

- The internet (chats, email messages, bulletin boards, blogs)

- Social media (Twitter, Facebook)

- Instant messaging platforms (WhatsApp, Skype, Discord)

- Conferencing apps (WebEx, Zoom)

People who start groups are encouraged to register on the founding organization websites. These sites provide resources about starting new groups as well as other resources about the groups, addiction, and dealing with the addiction of others.

How Can People Learn More About Al-Anon and Alateen?

In addition to providing literature for group members, Alateen and Al-Anon provide resources for professionals who work with addiction. To make the literature more accessible to more people, these resources are in English, Spanish, and French.

For people who prefer to learn by listening, the Al-Anon Family Groups site also posts podcasts that serve as introductions to their meetings. The organizations also publish articles and blog posts where people relate their experiences firsthand.

Knowledge is power. Al-Anon and Alateen work to provide their members with knowledge so they can be more powerful and so they can fight the effects of addiction.

Sources

al-anon.org - Al-Anon Meetings

al-anon.org - New Al-Anon Group Registration

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