Pills Anonymous in South Dakota, United States Directory

With the high cost of addiction treatment services, it can be hard to stay the course in recovery. Free addiction treatment resources in South Dakota are there to ensure everyone can access the treatment supports they need to live drug-free lifestyles.

Staying engaged in the recovery process is hard enough without having to worry about treatment costs. For people coming off full-blown addiction problems, ongoing participation in the treatment process is critical to ongoing sobriety. Fortunately, there are low-cost and free addiction treatment resources in South Dakota that can provide the ongoing support you need to stay clean and sober.

Addiction Treatment - A Long-Term Commitment

Drugs and alcohol are psychoactive substances, meaning their chemical makeup allows them to interact with and change the brain’s chemical system. If you use drugs like heroin, Adderall, or Ativan for months or years at a time, they will gradually alter the brain’s chemical pathways. The same goes for alcohol. Not only that, but the brain develops a dependence on these substances to the point where it can’t function right without them. Once this dependence starts to impact the areas that regulate thinking, emotions, and behavior, addiction has taken hold.

For these reasons, addiction can’t be cured in a day, or a week, or a month but requires ongoing treatment. During your time in treatment, the brain has time to heal while you acquire the skills needed to replace the addiction mindset with a lifestyle that promotes continued sobriety. While addiction recovery does require a long-term commitment, there are free addiction recovery resources in South Dakota that can help you stay on course.

Types of Free Addiction Treatment Resources in South Dakota

Addiction Counseling

Addiction counseling is a core component of recovery, which accounts for why it’s used in detox, inpatient, residential, and outpatient programs. As far as free addiction treatment resources in South Dakota go, counseling is unique in that it offers a range of benefits that deal with your particular treatment needs in recovery. Counseling helps you remain aware of the ways addiction shows up in your daily life, particularly how it impacts your thinking and behaviors. From there, you develop coping skills that are designed to help you replace addiction-based patterns with healthy ways of perceiving and interacting with the world around you.

Alcoholics Anonymous - Narcotics Anonymous

As one of the most widely-used methods of recovery support, 12-Step support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous provide you with clear guidelines on how to live a sober lifestyle. These groups are social networks made up of people who support one another, share the same goals, and face the same challenges in recovery. This social network approach also includes a sponsor, which is someone who helps you work through problems you’re facing in your daily life.

Sober Living Homes

Severe, long-term, and chronic addiction problems warp the brain in drastic ways. Addiction-based thinking and behaviors have become ingrained to the point where returning home after residential treatment can place you at high risk for relapse. A sober living home is a training ground where you learn how to manage addiction while taking on real-world responsibilities.

Sober living residents work jobs, pay rent, and maintain the home. They’re also required to attend support group meetings and abide by the rules of the house, such as curfews and no drugs or alcohol on the premises. These low-cost treatment resources in South Dakota can be a godsend for people who’ve completed a treatment program but are not quite ready to assume the pressures and responsibilities of real life.

SMART Recovery

SMART Recovery groups offer an alternative to the 12-Step support group model by applying a self-help approach to the recovery process. While SMART groups do operate as support groups, the goal is to help members develop the coping skills needed to support sobriety on their own. While nowhere near as popular as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous, this free addiction recovery resource in South Dakota uses one of the newer approaches to addiction recovery.

Dual Recovery Anonymous

Dual Recovery Anonymous, another 12-Step support group, caters to people in recovery who also struggle with mental health problems. Because of the effects drug and alcohol abuse have on the brain, it’s not uncommon for long-time substance abusers to develop mental health disorders like depression, anxiety problems, and even bipolar disorder. On the flip-side, people struggling with mental health issues often turn to drugs and alcohol to gain relief from these conditions. Like other types of 12-Step groups, Dual Recovery Anonymous provides you with a 12 step plan for recovery along with a support network of like-minded individuals. While not everyone will benefit from this treatment resource in South Dakota, it can go a long way towards helping people with dual diagnosis conditions manage the recovery process.

Resources for Friends & Family

As important as it is for individuals in recovery to get the support they need, more often than not, friends and family also suffer from addiction’s effects. Addiction breed lies, distrust, and other types of dysfunctional interactions in relationships. As a result, spouses, partners, siblings, children, and friends can all become a part of the addiction cycle without even knowing it. Fortunately, there are many treatment resources in South Dakota for friends and family.

Here are a few to consider:

  • Counseling - Friends and family can benefit from counseling in the same way the recovering addict does. Counseling helps you identify how addiction impacts your quality of life while helping you develop ways of shielding yourself from addiction’s effects.
  • Al-Anon Support Groups - Spouses and partners often bear the brunt of the problems addiction causes, which can wear away at your self-esteem and self-identity. Al-Anon meetings follow a 12-Step plan that’s designed to help spouses and partners recover from addiction’s effects and develop the skills needed to hold themselves and the person in recovery responsible for their actions.
  • Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOA) - Anyone who grew up in a household where alcohol or drug abuse was common may carry the harmful effects of this experience into adulthood. Adult Children of Alcoholics support groups help you identify destructive patterns of thinking and behavior acquired during childhood. The overall goals of ACOA work to help you develop a healthy relationship with yourself while also helping you develop healthy relationships with others.

Ultimately, there are no shortcuts in recovery. And as comprehensive as structured treatment programs can be, it’s important to stay the course after completing a treatment program. Free addiction recovery resources in South Dakota make it possible for anyone to access ongoing treatment help, both now and for years to come.

Sources:

  • who.int - Neuroscience of Psychoactive Substance Use and Dependence
  • aa.org - Alcoholics Anonymous: Find Local A.A.
  • archives.drugabuse.gov -Psychotherapy and Counseling in the Treatment of Drug Abuse

Many people abuse pills, are addicted to them, or once struggled with pill abuse or addiction. So it’s not surprising that there are many members of Pills Anonymous.

What Is Pills Anonymous?

Pills Anonymous (PA) is an organization that aims to help its members stop using pills. It’s similar to other recovery and sobriety organizations such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA). Like AA and NA, Pills Anonymous:

-Encourages members to progress through a series of twelve steps to find addiction recovery. This process is called “working the steps.”

-Follows twelve traditions to guide the organization as a whole.

-Values its members’ anonymity.

-Provides literature about the program, addiction, and other matters related to addiction.

-Is free to join, but accepts donations during meetings and sells literature to raise funds.

Pills Anonymous also shares similarities with recovery and sobriety groups such as Marijuana Anonymous. Both groups:

-Feature a series of questions that people can ask themselves to determine if they have an addiction.

-Operate under the World Service Conference to provide management and ways for members to access its service.

Like other 12-step groups, Pills Anonymous (PA) welcomes people to join. According to PA, “The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using pills.”

What Is a Pills Anonymous Group?

A group is the basic operating unit of Pills Anonymous. Anyone who wishes to become and remain sober can hold a PA meeting. PA will recognize the meeting as a local group if the meeting:

-Includes people who want to stop using pills.

-Supports itself financially.

-Aims to help people stop using pills by using PA’s twelve steps.

-Does not express opinions about non-PA outside issues or outside affiliations.

-Strives to attract new members instead of promoting the group for its own sake.

There are different kinds of Pills Anonymous meetings and groups, including:

-H&I: Gatherings for residents or clients of hospitals or institutions who cannot attend regular PA meetings. These are introductory or beginners’ gatherings and are not  required to be self-supporting.

-Speaker: Gatherings where one or more members of PA share personal experiences for longer amounts of time.

-Participation: Gatherings where PA members share personal experiences, one person at a time.

-Book study: Gatherings where people discuss and study PA literature and related resources.

-Step study: Gatherings where people discuss and study the twelve steps of PA.

Instead of using the term leader, PA says that trusted servants can help manage (not govern) individual groups.

Groups can appoint people to serve in positions, including but not limited to:

-Treasurer

-Secretary

-Group service representative

-A world service conference delegate

-Chairperson

-Guest chairperson

-Coffeemaker

-Greeter

-Literature person.

What Kinds of Meetings Does Pills Anonymous Meetings Offer?

People who want to attend a Pills Anonymous (PA) meeting can do so in many areas in the United States and around the world.

In-Person Meetings

The Pills Anonymous website lists several in-person meetings. One page also includes handy codes that include more specific information:

-C = Closed meeting (meetings that are closed to nonmembers)

-O = Open meetings for both members and nonmembers (everyone)

-H = Handicap-accessible meetings

-B = Babysitting services available at these meetings

-M = Men’s only meetings

-W = Women’s only meetings

-LGBT = Lesbian gay bisexual transgender population meetings

There are many types of PA meetings and many ways to attend them.

Virtual Meetings

Virtual meetings may be available for people who desire to stop abusing prescription pills, but for whom it may not always be possible, easy, or desirable to attend in-person meetings.

For example, there may not be any regular in-person meetings in their geographical area. Or, due to the spread of the contagious COVID-19, buildings may be closed and residents ordered to shelter-at-home by their county or state governments.

Pills Anonymous lists some virtual meetings on its site with codes that include whether they are open, closed, etc.

Starting Your Own Meetings

People can also start Pills Anonymous meetings of their own. The PA website includes resources for starting meetings, including suggestions for meeting formats.

For example, a PA participation meeting may start with the meeting conductor:

-Welcoming new members and explaining the program

-Asking members to read from Pills Anonymous literature, such as its Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions.

-Passing a basket for voluntary contributions.

-Awarding chips or tokens to commemorate different periods of sobriety.

Participation meetings also allow people to share their experiences. Pills Anonymous doesn’t allow crosstalk during its sharing periods. Only one person can speak at a time, though others can ask the speaker questions.

The group may set limits for sharing periods, such as allowing people to speak for 3–5 minutes only.

People may be encouraged to share contact information if they have questions or other things to share.

Depending on the preferences of the group members, meetings might end with meditation, a prayer, or in some other way.

Like other 12-step meetings and sobriety groups, Pills Anonymous acknowledges that people have different wants and needs. While sobriety is the common destination, there are many paths to get there.

Sources

 

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