Talk With a Treatment Specialist

Call:949-276-2886


Women for Sobriety in New Hampshire, United States Directory

Suffering from substance abuse is difficult, but all the more challenging when you don’t have the resources to get help. As a New Hampshire resident, you can take a look at the comprehensive list of free and low-cost addiction treatment options mentioned in this post.

New Hampshire is known for its white mountains, gorgeous rivers, and granite formations--a state that reminds us of nature’s spectacular beauty. It is also one of the states with the highest median income per household. This is why it will come as a surprise for others when they find out that New Hampshire has one of the highest rates of opioid overdose and the highest rate of fentanyl overdose in the country.

As a resident of the White Mountain State, you may feel like you’re far from what’s considered ‘average’ in your area. Although you want to get addiction help, you may not have the financial capacity at this time. Thankfully, there are free substance abuse services you can use to get started. In this post, you will discover some state-funded, non-profits, and other resources for your recovery journey.

Free Addiction Treatment Resource: New Hampshire

Addiction treatment doesn’t have to be costly. Although inpatient rehab works well for most, some do not have the health insurance or out-of-pocket finances to start their recovery journey. You can get the help you need as soon as possible with no-cost options.

How to Start Your Search for Free Treatment Resources and Programs

Since there are many choices for free treatment, it is important to know what is right for you. Below is a quick guide to narrow down your search for a no-cost program.

  • Read through this list of New Hampshire resources: Before deciding on a program, it is important to read over a comprehensive list of choices. Understanding what each treatment entails and knowing what to expect can help in your level of commitment.
  • Pick 2-3 options that may work well for you: Once you’ve read through the list, pick your top 2 or 3 programs and reach out to their contact numbers. Know the extra details, requirements, scheduling, and other things you need to start the treatment.
  • Prepare for the program: Getting ready for treatment includes freeing up your schedule, committing to a healthier lifestyle, and also bringing requirements needed by administrators.

Here are the free and low-cost options for substance abuse treatment in New Hampshire.

State-Funded Programs

New Hampshire has its own Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Services. They have a news feed, recovery support programs, as well as family support for affected household members. They are also affiliated with an organization called Hope for NH Recovery, where people can seek coaches to help them in battling substance abuse.

You can visit the Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Services’ main website as well as the Hope for NH Recovery coaching program.

Local Meetings

Aside from government-run programs, you can also join non-profit established meetings. These programs can be faith-based or demographics-based.

Find Support Locally

To find local support, you may reach out to these organizations and indicate your city, town, or neighborhood area. They will help you look for the nearest support group from home.

Local AA Meetings

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a non-profit organization established to help people suffering from alcohol abuse. The program is free to join, and a known motto is: “The only requirement is the desire to quit alcohol”. People from all walks of life share their stories, receive support, and encourage others through their alcohol recovery journey. To find a meeting closest to you, you may visit the Alcoholics Anonymous NH for more information.

Local NA Meetings

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is similar to AA in the sense that they focus on people with substance abuse problems apart from alcohol. Opioid, cocaine, meth, and all other types of drug addiction sufferers are all welcome in these meetings. Like AA, NA hopes to connect people in drug abuse recovery so that they can get support and learn from each other. You may visit the official Narcotics Anonymous website for New Hampshire here.

Faith-Based Meetings

Churches all over New Hampshire also offer peer-based support through their “life groups” or “discipleship groups”. These groups meet regularly to study the Bible, pray together, and share about each others’ lives while growing in the Christian faith.

If you are not near these areas, you may visit or contact a local church and ask if they have faith-based meetings available.

Online Self-Help Forums

If meeting personally or attending programs may seem uncomfortable at first, you can ease your way into addiction treatment by joining online self-help forums. In these boards, people are free to ask questions, share their experiences, and help others in their addiction recovery journey. You may visit this site for a comprehensive list, or join Reddit’s section for substance abuse recovery.

Other Options / Paid Options

Free treatment isn’t for everyone. Some may need a full inpatient rehab to avoid the risk of addiction relapse. In these situations, there are still ways to receive treatment without payment or at a minimal cost. Here are some strategies and options you can do:

Scholarships

If you are planning to go back to college or will be taking a post-Graduate degree, you can go for a scholarship in a university that offers free addiction treatment. The first step is to look for New Hampshire scholarships, which can be found on Unigo.com and Scholarships.com. Once you get your grant or financial aid approved, you can choose a New Hampshire-based college or university that offers sober dormitories, addiction counseling, and peer support recovery programs for free.

Insurance

Health insurance is also one of the best ways to have treatment coverage for inpatient rehab. Even if your health insurance does not explicitly indicate addiction treatment as part of the plan, you may still be able to have substance abuse-related services covered. For example, you can get lab tests, counseling, psychotherapy, or physician checkups under your health insurance. You may also verify your insurance under trusted rehabilitation centers.

Loans

If you strongly feel that going through a premium addiction rehab will help you, it is possible to take out a personal loan. There are several loaning companies available in New Hampshire for all types of credit scores.

WalletHub also offers a comprehensive list of personal loans in New Hampshire with rates you can compare.

12 Step Programs and Non-Religious

To further understand what you can expect during a full rehab, you can ask a high-quality rehab center about the treatment programs they are offering. Commonly, premium rehab facilities offer two main categories of treatment:

  • 12-Step Rehab: This type of approach includes a spiritual-based protocol comprising 12 steps. The core of this program asks the participant to admit their powerlessness over addiction while surrendering to a Higher Power that can empower them towards their recovery journey.
  • Non-Religious Programs: People who want to try a secular approach may go for non-12 Step programs. These include self-management techniques as well as holistic treatments such as aromatherapy, massage therapy, or art therapy. Commonly, patients report positive results in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, one of the many types of psychotherapies available in high-quality rehab centers.

Friends and Family

Those who love and care for you can be your greatest source of support when seeking treatment. You may reach out to family and friends, asking them to be a sponsor for your rehab treatment. Explaining to them about your struggles and how you want to be better for those you love may encourage them to provide you with financial support. Doing this will also allow you to commit better, as the resources come from those who are backing you up during your recovery journey.

Recovery Advice When Money Is Scarce

It is possible to recover from substance abuse even without much money. If free programs would not suffice for your needs, there is still a way to get a full rehab over time. Here is a step-by-step suggestion as you transition from free programs to paid treatment:

  • Start with free addiction treatment programs as early as possible: There is no single way to addiction recovery, but one thing is common--the earlier you start your program, the better your outcomes will be. This will also help you avoid life-threatening complications such as worsening mental health problems, relapse, or overdose.
  • Take small steps to fund your paid rehab: Free programs are usually one element of full inpatient rehab. Thus, you can gradually fund your paid rehab even when taking a free program. Apply for loans, ask for sponsorships from loved ones, or negotiate with your health insurance provider for treatment coverage.
  • Get support from your community: If you underwent paid rehab or free programs, it is important to get plugged into your community for addiction recovery support. You can join support groups that meet locally or participate in programs that battle substance abuse in your area.

Financially Struggling? Recovery Is Possible

Financial problems shouldn’t stop you from getting the treatment you deserve. With the strategies mentioned above, you can start with free treatment and move your way to a premium paid rehab without spending a lot. Recovery is possible with a little bit of strategy and a whole lot of determination to break the chains of substance abuse.

Sources:

Since Alcoholics Anonymous delineated the 12 steps in 1938, hundreds of other groups have adopted similar language for other addictions and problems. Women for Sobriety (WFS) might seem like another one at first glance, but it’s not.

Similarities include that:

- Both are peer support communities that meet in person and online.

-Both have creeds (13 acceptances instead of 12 steps).

-Both advocate for abstinence rather than moderation.

-Both are nonprofit organizations whose meetings are free to attend (although donations are accepted to help defray the costs).

Differences include the fact that WFS is a younger organization. A sociologist started it in 1975. For another, membership is limited to women. It’s based on the principles that women in recovery have special emotional needs, so recovery programs should help them

- Nurture feelings of self-value and self-worth.

-Discard feelings of guilt, shame, and humiliation.

Women for Sobriety and its New Life Program teach self-empowerment and sisterhood, positive thinking, meditation, healthy lifestyles and diets, and ways to create social safety nets.

WFS believes that substance use disorder begins as a coping mechanism for the guilt, depression, and stress that women experience in competing societal roles.

Studies have suggested that Women for Sobriety is as effective as 12-step programs for individuals with alcohol use disorder.

Meetings usually follow the same structured format:

Reading of the 13 acceptances (though they come in pairs, so there are really 26) in a call-and-response type format (one person reads the first statement, and the group as a whole reads the next).

Introductions by the attendees that are similar to AA introductions of “My name is blank and I’m an alcoholic.” WFS members say, “My name is blank and I am a competent woman,” followed by sharing a positive event since the last meeting. These statements begin with the phrase “This week I … ,” and are usually connected to one of the acceptances.

Reading of the WFS mission statement and its group agreement (which states that “Sisters in the Women for Sobriety New Life Program are 4C women,” meaning capable, competent, caring, and compassionate).

Group discussion of a topic.

Meetings typically close with a group reading of the WFS motto while holding hands. The motto is: “We are capable and competent, caring and compassionate, always willing to help another, bonded together in overcoming our addictions." (Twelve-step meetings often end with a prayer.)

In keeping with the 4C message, WFS is about sharing, not preaching. Every woman will have a unique path to recovery. The members are respectful in their language and attitude (no verbal abuse, no interrupting or talking over each other).

Finally, Women for Sobriety features six levels of recovery. These levels are also akin to the 12 steps in that they measure progress to recovery.

If a member should relapse, in part or whole, she revisits an earlier level. The levels encourage WFS members to

- Admit to addictions.

- Commit to abstinence.

- Remove negativity by journaling.

- Replace negative thoughts with positive thoughts.

- Improve relationships.

- Find their place in the world spiritually.

Women for Sobriety is open to any woman who wants to end her addiction. “All expressions of female identity are welcome.”

If there is not a WFS meeting in her area, any woman can request a phone support volunteer or request WFS online support.

Resources

Meeting finder - womenforsobriety.org/meetings/

Email address - [email protected]

Online support - https://wfsonline.org/signup

Address - P.O. Box 618, Quakertown, PA 18951

Phone number - (215) 536-8026

No Records Found

Sorry, no records were found. Please adjust your search criteria and try again.

Google Map Not Loaded

Sorry, unable to load Google Maps API.

866-271-5648 Verify Insurance