Chicago's Top Addiction Resource & Information Guide

Chicago, Illinois, is one of the largest cities in the United States and one of its most popular tourist destinations. Nevertheless, it has serious problems with gun violence and substance abuse, particularly the synthetic opioid fentanyl. Harm reduction, including the wider availability of the overdose reversal drug Narcan, seems to be easing those numbers.

Last Edited:

04/13/2022

Chicago, Illinois, is one of the largest, most famous, and most popular tourist destinations. The residents of the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) that contains Chicago, Illinois (the Chicago-Naperville-Elgin MSA, also incorporating parts of Indiana and Wisconsin), are the 27th happiest in the U.S.

Out-of-towners love it, too. Condé Nast Traveler magazine’s Readers’ Choice Awards 2021 ranked Chicago, Illinois, as the best big city in the U.S. for the fifth consecutive year. That doesn’t mean it’s problem-free.

Chicago, Illinois, also has one of the highest violent crime rates (19th nationwide in 2021) and, in 2019, was ranked the 57th most dangerous city (population 100,000 or more) in the U.S.

Demographics of Chicago, Illinois

Chicago, Illinois, is by far the largest city in Illinois by population. At 2,746,388 (in the 2020 Census), it is more than 15 times larger than the number two contender. Alone it accounts for more than one-half of the population of Cook County (5,275,541) and one-fifth of Illinois (12,812,508). It is also the third-largest city in the United States.

The median age in Chicago, Illinois, is 35.2, younger than Cook County, 37.2, Illinois, 38.6, and the United States, 38.5.

Racially and ethnically, Chicago, Illinois, is more diverse than Cook County, Illinois, and the US as a whole.

The total Hispanic population is also greater in Chicago, Illinois (28.8%) than in Cook County (25.6%), Illinois (17.5%), and the U.S. (18.4%).

Address: 19067 W Frontage Rd, Raymond, IL 62560-505

Economics of Chicago, Illinois

In 2019, in Chicago, Illinois:

  • The poverty rate was 18.4%, higher than in Cook County (14.4%), Illinois (12.5%), and the U.S. (12.3%).
  • The median annual household income was $61,811, lower than Cook County ($69,4290, Illinois ($69,187), and the U.S. ($65,712).
  • The median property value was $275,200, higher than in Cook County ($261,400), Illinois ($209,100), and the U.S. ($240,500).

In general, people in Chicago, Illinois, tended to achieve higher education, at least once past high school, than Cook County, Illinois, and the United States as a whole:

  • A higher percentage in Chicago, Illinois, has no high school diploma (16.9%) than in Cook County (14.2%), Illinois (11.7%), and the United States (13%) overall.
  • More have a bachelor’s degree in Chicago, Illinois, and Cook County (36.5%) than in Illinois (32.9%) and the U.S. (30.3%).
  • More (4.5%) have an advanced degree ( MBA, Ph.D., MD), compared to Cook County (4.2%), Illinois (3.4%), and the U.S. (3.3%).

Problems Facing Chicago, Illinois

In one ranking of the safest cities in the United States, Chicago, Illinois, was 273rd out of 303, lower than New York City (144), Boston (177), or Los Angeles (197), but better than New Orleans (296) or Detroit (301). (For safest cities in Illinois, it’s 242nd out of 265, but not all municipalities are included.)

A large part of the reason is the rise in gun violence—including shootings, homicides, and carjackings—and opioid-related overdose deaths in the first half of 2020 during the pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic also remains a problem. As of October 14, 2021, Illinois had the 25th highest statewide COVID death rate (219 per 100,000) in the US, about one-third lower than Mississippi (333) and four times higher than Vermont (54).

As of October 11, 2021, Illinois had registered 27,924 COVID-19 deaths out of 1,647,364 cases. Cook County accounted for 42% of those deaths—11,816—and almost 38% of the cases.

Substance Abuse in Chicago, Illinois

It’s not always possible to separate Chicago’s substance abuse problems from nearby communities. In the larger Cook County area, the worst substance use disorders involve:

Opioids

There were at least 1,833 opioid overdose deaths in Cook County in 2020. Less than one-fourth (446) involved naturally occurring opioids such as heroin.

The other 75% (1,387) involved synthetic opioids such as fentanyl. Almost two-thirds (65.7% or 912) were in Chicago. In the first six months of 2021, opioid overdose deaths involving only fentanyl increased by 6%.

Fentanyl is up to 50 times as strong as heroin, making an accidental overdose much more likely. Worse, people often don’t know they are using fentanyl because it is added to or substituted for other drugs or pressed into pill form and sold as prescription opioids.

In the first half of 2021, however, opioid overdose deaths in Chicago, Illinois, dropped significantly—non-fatal overdoses, 25%; fatal overdoses, 20%—due to harm reduction efforts, including greater access to the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone (Narcan).

Alcohol

Another factor in the decline may have been lockdowns due to COVID-19.

In Cook County, the average number of opioid-related overdose deaths per week was:

  • 22.6, January 2018–December 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic reached the US.
  • 35.1, December 15, 2019–March 20, 2020, a more than one-third increase.
  • 43.4, March 21–May 30, 2020, during the stay-at-home order, an almost 25% increase.
  • 31.2, May 31–October 6, 2020, a drop of more than 25% once the order was lifted.

Alcohol also remains a problem. In 2017, an estimated 505,000 Chicago, Illinois, adults engaged in binge drinking (more than five standard drinks in two hours for men, four for women). Of those, 8% did so more than five times in the previous month.

In Chicago, Illinois, in 2017, 223 deaths were caused by alcohol use, and 257 deaths were due to cirrhosis and chronic liver disease caused by alcohol use. (Deaths caused by drunk driving, homicides committed while drunk or medical conditions such as strokes that may be exacerbated by alcohol use were not counted.)

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Student Substance Abuse in Chicago, Illinois Colleges

While not all substance abuse indicates addiction or other substance use disorder (SUD)—there are 11 diagnostic criteria—use of even legal prescription drugs without a prescription or other than as prescribed is illegal. So is all underage drinking, which applies to a large percentage of college and university students.

Of undergraduate students at the University of Chicago, Illinois, for the 2019 fall semester, more than half were younger than 21.

It’s not only illegal; it’s damaging. Underage drinking and drug use can impair development and is more likely to lead to substance use disorders when started before age 25 because the brain is still developing.

For example, the likelihood that smoking cigarettes will become a habit is 50.1% if started before age 18, 33.1% if started between ages 18 and 20, but only 16.8% if started at age 21 or older.

A report released in 2016 found that those who used prescription opioids nonmedically between the ages of 10 and 12 were at the greatest risk of later developing a heroin use disorder. Heroin use most often begins between ages 17 and 18, and in the US, young adults between the ages of 18 and 25 have the highest rates of heroin use.

Alcohol is the most prevalent substance use disorder, however. In 2017, among Chicago, Illinois, public high school students:

  • 57.3% said they had consumed alcohol (60.4% in the US overall)
  • 23.9% had recent alcohol use (29.8% US)
  • 16.8% had their first drink before age 13 (15.5% US)
  • 9.1 % reported recent binge drinking (13.5% US)

Chicago, Illinois, is home to more than a dozen national and regional colleges and universities, plus art, faith, and health profession schools, including:

  • The University of Illinois Chicago is the only public research college and the largest university in Chicago. Alcohol (except in designated areas by those ages 21 and older), tobacco, and illicit drugs are prohibited, but the university provides educational programs and counseling to students who use substances or who are affected by others’ substance use.
  • DePaul University is the largest Catholic university in the nation. It offers students support with an alcohol and substance abuse prevention specialist, the BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students) program, and the office of Health Promotion and Wellness (HPW).
  • The University of Chicago, Illinois, is ranked high among national universities (tied for sixth place) by US News & World Report magazine, which also rates it the best university for veterans. UChicago, Illinois Student Wellness has resources and support services, including BASICS, to help students with alcohol and drug use issues.

Substance Abuse Treatment in Chicago, Illinois

Substance use abuse alone does not cause substance use disorders; it is a chronic illness like cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. While it’s true that the abuse can trigger the addiction, some people have a genetic predisposition to it. That’s why some people can drink a lot without developing a habit, while others can’t drink safely at all.

Dual Diagnosis Rehab in Chicago, Illinois

A 2018 study revealed that almost four times (19.3%) as many adults with any mental illness (AMI) had a SUD—almost six times (28%) as many with a serious mental illness (SMI)—than those with no mental illness (5%).

Other studies and anecdotal reports suggest it is 50% or higher. It is a common enough complaint that there are multiple terms to describe it, including co-occurring disorders and dual diagnosis.

One possible reason is that people with a mental illness, realizing something is wrong, try to self-medicate the symptoms—anxiety, depression—with alcohol or drugs. Another is that drug use causes the symptoms of mental illness.

Either way, both disorders must be treated for the client to have a chance at recovery. Unless the client’s counselors are knowledgeable about both mental illness and addiction, however, one disorder may not even be diagnosed.

Some counselors still think only the primary disorder needs to be treated, but now many favors one of these treatment approaches:

  • Sequential. First, treat one disorder. When that treatment is completed, treat the other.
  • Simultaneous. Separate mental health and substance abuse teams treat the client in parallel with the other.
  • Integrated. One team treats both disorders at the same time.

Luxury Rehab

A luxury rehab resembles a resort more than a hospital, with:

  • Better furnishings
  • Better scenery
  • Better food
  • Private rooms
  • Private bathroom.

It’s not a vacation, however. There’s still the hard work of treating substance use disorders and any co-occurring or contributing factors, such as mental illness. Luxury rehab may be a necessity for some, so if a treatment center doesn’t have it, consider looking close by. If interested in attending rehab in Chicago, consider checking in the south side of the state, East St. Louis, as well.

Executive rehab, a variation of luxury rehab, may provide or permit business owners and executives to work remotely while in rehab, so long as it doesn’t interfere with treatment.

Drug Rehab in Chicago, Illinois

There are many types of drug use disorders. The best rehabs will have the tools to treat them all.

Opioids, particularly the synthetic opioid fentanyl, are the largest concern because it is so potent that a slight miscalculation can kill. Worse, users usually aren’t aware they are taking fentanyl because it is often mixed with or sold as other opioids—including heroin and, pressed into pill form, as prescription meds such as OxyContin—and even non-opioids such as cocaine.

One additional treatment for clients with opioid use disorder is narcotic replacement therapy or medication-assisted treatment (MAT), using other opioids—methadone, buprenorphine—with low risk of abuse to prevent withdrawal without the euphoria or the high associated with opioid use.

A third drug, naltrexone—usually administered as a once-monthly injection—prevents opioid euphoria but not opioid withdrawal.

Other drugs without a safe replacement option include:

  • Marijuana. Also known as cannabis. It’s never fatal but can lead to dependence and withdrawal.
  • K2 or Spice. A synthetic with similar effects to marijuana, K2 has caused deaths but is largely unregulated.
  • Stimulants. The most popular include cocaine, but many young people got hooked through using legal drugs (Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall) to treat symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or as study drugs.
  • Central Nervous System Depressants. Drugs for insomnia, anxiety, and stress, including benzodiazepines and barbiturates, other sedatives, tranquilizers, and hypnotics). They also can lower blood pressure, slow breathing, and brain activity. Stopping cold turkey can cause a dangerous increase in all of the above.

Alcohol Rehab in Chicago, Illinois

Alcohol is a drug, too, specifically a CNS depressant. Stopping cold turkey is not advised. Some MATs can help, however:

  • Acamprosate. Reduces the craving to drink but doesn’t prevent withdrawal.
  • Disulfiram. Causes sickening side effects if alcohol use continues or resumes.
  • Naltrexone. As with opioids, this stops the good feelings associated with drinking, but not the impairment.

Holistic Rehab in Chicago, Illinois

Holistic rehab treats the whole person, not just the substance abuser. The goal is well-being spiritually and emotionally, not just physically.

Holistic practices include:

  • Mindfulness
  • Meditation
  • Yoga
  • Tai chi
  • Art and music therapy
  • Massage
  • Acupuncture
  • Good nutrition
  • Horseback riding

Aftercare Planning Procedures

Because the best science now says SUDs are chronic diseases like diabetes, total cures are probably not possible. Recovery requires a continuum of care for the rest of the client’s life. That’s where aftercare comes in.

By designing an aftercare plan, counselors help clients minimize the risk of relapse, learn new behaviors, and avoid the people, places, and situations when they used to abuse substances.

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Support groups

A support group doesn’t have to be with a formal therapist. Peer fellowships—groups of people also in recovery, some for years—give clients a place to vent, share, and learn from the experiences (triumphs and setbacks) of others. Group members may even become sober friends.

12-step rehab in Chicago, Illinois

One popular SUD treatment that is free and widely available uses what is known as the Twelve Steps. These are a series of acknowledgments and acts designed to accept responsibility for one’s addiction and actions, atone for them, and to pay it forward by helping others.

Twelve-step rehab is about more than the Twelve Steps, however. Twelve-step groups hold meetings in which they publicly acknowledge their SUD and share stories about their progress, setbacks, and attempts to remain sober.

Members of Twelve Step groups are encouraged to come back even after they seem to have their substance use under control. In part, this is because the founders knew from long experience that complacency leads to relapse, but also so members with long-term sobriety can serve as an example and mentors for those newly sober.

Some twelve-step programs have offshoots for the family and friends of those with SUDs.

  • Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings of people with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to offer mutual support as they try to stay abstinent and work the Twelve Steps. Those with long-term sobriety sometimes act as sponsors to newer members. More than 20 meetings weekly in Joliet, IL, alone, most in-person but a couple only online, plus meetings in other cities and online.
  • Adult Children of Alcoholics. A twelve-step group for people who grew up in families that were dysfunctional due to an AUD. The only Joliet-based meeting is currently Zoom-only, but there are online and telephone meetings, too.
  • Narcotics Anonymous. Like AA but for those with narcotic use disorders. Only one meeting is currently listed in Joliet. Nar-Anon and Narateen. Like Al-Anon/Alateen but for the family and friends of those with narcotic use disorders. No Nar-Anon meetings are currently listed in (but three within 25 miles of) Joliet, plus virtual meetings (plus six virtual Narateen meetings).
  • Cocaine Anonymous. No meetings listed in (but several within 25 to 50 miles of) Joliet, plus virtual meetings.
  • Dual Recovery Anonymous. Twelve-step program for those with a dual diagnosis/co-occurring disorders. No meetings listed in (but several within 30 miles of) Joliet.
  • Marijuana Anonymous. No meetings within 50 miles of Joliet, but 35 online meetings.
  • Local Celebrate Recovery groups. All 12-step programs are at least quasi-Christian but Celebrate Recovery is a Christ-centered 12-step program. There are two meetings listed in Joliet, Illinois, plus another dozen within 25 miles.
  • Crystal Meth Anonymous. No meetings in Joliet but nine in Chicago and seven online.

Non-12-step rehab in Chicago, Illinois

Support groups that do not use the Twelve Steps format are usually science- or evidence-based as opposed to faith-based. Non-12-step rehab can be found all around the state, in treatment centers in Springfield, for example. They include:

  • SMART Recovery. Self-Management and Recovery Training has trained facilitators who teach scientifically validated tools and techniques to change addictive behaviors. There is only one meeting listed in Joliet, Illinois, but about 10 within 25 miles, including three that have moved online.
  • LifeRing Secular Recovery. Members share experiences to help them design their recovery plan. There are no meetings listed in Joliet, and the only meeting in Illinois has moved online, but there are more online meetings.
  • Women for Sobriety. A support group of women for women in recovery. There are no meetings listed for Joliet but four in Chicago.
  • Moderation Management. This group aims to curtail problem drinking, not necessarily all drinking. There don’t seem to be any face-to-face meetings in Illinois, but there are phone and video meetings.
  • Parents of Addicted Loved Ones. In-person meetings and phone calls focus on the challenges of parenting someone who is misusing substances. Includes religious aspects but is open to all. No meetings in or near Joliet, Illinois (and only one in Illinois), but online meetings.
  • Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing (GRASP). A healing community for those who have lost a loved one to a substance use overdose. There are no meetings in (but three meetings within 35 miles of) Joliet, Illinois.

What to Look For When Choosing From Rehabs in Chicago, Illinois

To ensure the best possible care, here are some things for clients or their families to check:

Accreditation

This shows that a facility has met the minimum requirements or standards for behavioral health and opioid treatment programs (OTPs); the center or organization needs accreditation from an independent body. The three bodies approved for this purpose by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA) are:

Some addiction treatment centers can also become a Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic (CCBHC) or a designated collaborative organization (DCO).

In addition, counselors in Illinois must be certified by the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Association (IAODAPCA).

Client-to-Staff Ratio

This means how many clients each staff member oversees or cares for. While there is no universal standard, the fewer clients-per-staff member, the better. Acceptable ratios vary from as few as three clients per staff to as many as 10, though not all programs meet them.

Treatment Options at Rehab Centers in Chicago, Illinois

Treatment options differ by types of programs, treatment approaches, and levels of care. Clients may transition from one to another as their recovery progresses.

Usually, treatment for substance abuse requires more than one approach because not everyone responds to the same treatment, but not every treatment center offers every type of treatment.

In particular, not all substance abuse programs check their clients for co-occurring mental health issues—even though mental health and substance abuse co-occur almost 50% of the time—which can lead to or exacerbate substance abuse, and vice versa.

If clients want or need a particular treatment method, they should make sure it is included before deciding on a particular substance abuse treatment program or center. Better yet, contact the best facility you plan to enroll in for your 30-day drug treatment programs or alcohol treatment programs. Also make sure to ask them if your insurance will cover you for 60 day treatment, 90 day treatment, 120 day addiction treatment or even 7-14 day addiction rehab.

In Illinois, treatments for alcohol, drug, and other substance use disorders (SUDs) include:

  • Early Intervention. Treatment before individuals meet the diagnostic criteria for an SUD if their problems seem SUD-related or the risk factors are there.
  • Case Management. Coordinating the delivery of services for clients with SUDs or related problems.
  • Outpatient Treatment. Clients visit the rehab center for treatment several days a week, usually for a total of nine hours or less.
  • Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOP). Clients visit the rehab center more often, usually five days a week, for a total of about 19 hours.
  • Detoxification. Clients who are still using at the time they enter rehab, who are still tapering off, require detox in a medically monitored setting.
  • Residential Rehabilitation. Also known as inpatient rehab. The client stays in a rehab facility or on its grounds 24/7, so their behavior can be monitored. Drug tests may be required regularly.
  • Residential Aftercare. For clients who complete a recovery program but still feel they need additional help. These are essentially halfway houses for people in recovery, a place where they can live without temptation. There are several types of such recovery residences.

To find an Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) office, use the office locator or call the IDHS Help Line (800a843a6154; for TTY, 866a324a5553).

What to Expect During Inpatient Drug Rehab in Chicago, Illinois

There are some things most rehabs have in common:

  • Intake. The preliminary interview and assessment process, during which the client’s substance use disorder is evaluated, and the individualized course of treatment (and aftercare) is planned.
  • Detox. It may be necessary to wait or to help clients eliminate the drugs from their system before rehab can begin. Usually, this takes place in a separate medical facility.
  • Medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Also sometimes known as narcotic replacement therapy (NRT), this is the use of drugs to replace or taper off the use of a substance—such as methadone or buprenorphine (Suboxone) for opioids, acamprosate (Campral) for alcohol—while rehab begins. Other MATs cancel or prevent opioid intoxication (naltrexone or Vivitrol) or make individuals sick if they drink (disulfiram or Antabuse).

Aftercare Planning Procedures

Substance use disorders are now believed to be chronic diseases. That would mean they have no cure but, once developed, must be managed or controlled for life with a continuum of care.

Before leaving rehab, the counselors and clients must create an aftercare plan to minimize the risk of relapse even years into the future.

One of the most important ways to maintain sobriety is to avoid triggers, including people, events, and places where one’s substance abuse occurred. This means finding new places, ways, and people with which to fill one’s time.

Support groups

Joining a support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous gives people in recovery a sober way to spend their time, a place to share their feelings and fears about substance use, and a potential circle of friends (or at least acquaintances) who share their desire to stay sober.

Twelve-step rehab

The best-known and most widely available support groups for people with alcohol or drug use disorders follow the Twelve Step framework created by Alcoholics Anonymous. These peer support fellowships encourage meeting regularly with other people with similar use disorders at all levels of recovery.

In addition to sharing tales of success and failure, members also work the steps. Members with longstanding recovery sometimes act as sponsors—a sort of emergency contact—for those newly in recovery.

Twelve-step programs also exist for family and friends of people who used to or are still misusing substances.

  1. Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings of people with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to offer mutual support as they try to stay abstinent and work the Twelve Steps. Those with long-term sobriety sometimes act as sponsors to newer members. More than 150 meetings weekly in Chicago, IL alone, most online but a couple of dozen in person. Meetings in other cities and online.
  2. Al-Anon and Alateen. Mutual support groups For the family and friends of those with AUDs. There are more than 75 in Chicago, Illinois (four Alateen), plus electronic meetings.
  3. Adult Children of Alcoholics. Twelve Step group for people who grew up in families that were dysfunctional due to an AUD. There are about 20 face-to-face meetings in Chicago, plus online and telephone meetings.
  4. Narcotics Anonymous. Like AA but for those with narcotic use disorders. Twenty-two meetings are listed in Chicago, another dozen or so within 25 miles of Chicago, plus 14 virtual meetings.
  5. Nar-Anon and Narateen. Like Al-Anon/Alateen but for the family and friends of those with narcotic use disorders. Only one Nar-Anon meeting is listed in Chicago, plus virtual meetings (Narateen, too).
  6. Cocaine Anonymous. One meeting is listed in Chicago, plus two virtual meetings.
  7. Dual Recovery Anonymous. Twelve-step program for those with a dual diagnosis/co-occurring disorders. One meeting was listed within 25 miles of Chicago.
  8. Marijuana Anonymous. No meetings in Chicago, but one in Cook County.
  9. Local Celebrate Recovery groups. All 12-step programs are at least quasi-Christian but Celebrate Recovery is a Christ-centered 12-step program. There are six meetings listed in Chicago, Illinois, plus another 15 within 25 miles.
  10. Crystal Meth Anonymous. Nine meetings in Chicago, plus online meetings.

Non-12-Step rehab in Chicago, Illinois

Support groups that do not use the Twelve Steps format are usually science- or evidence-based as opposed to faith-based. They include:

  1. SMART Recovery. Self-Management and Recovery Training has trained facilitators who teach scientifically validated tools and techniques to change addictive behaviors. There are about 20 meetings in Chicago, Illinois, about a half dozen that have moved online.
  2. LifeRing Secular Recovery. Members share experiences to help them design their recovery plan. There’s only one meeting in Chicago, IL, plus online meetings.
  3. Women for Sobriety. A support group of women and for women in recovery. There are four meetings listed in Chicago, Illinois.
  4. Moderation Management. This group aims to curtail problem drinking, not necessarily all drinking. There don’t seem to be any face-to-face meetings in or near Chicago, but there are phone and video meetings available.
  5. Parents of Addicted Loved Ones. In-person meetings and phone calls focus on the challenges of parenting someone who is misusing substances. Includes religious aspects but is open to all. Free No meetings in or near Chicago, Illinois (and only one in Illinois), but online meetings.
  6. Grief Recovery After a Substance Passing (GRASP). A healing community for those who have lost a loved one to a substance use overdose. There are no meetings in (but four meetings within 20 to 40 miles) of Chicago.

Paying for Rehabs in Chicago, Illinois

More than half of all Americans’ health insurance coverage is through employer-provided plans, with some limitations and exceptions. Since 2014, businesses with 50 or more employees were required to provide mental health and substance abuse treatment as essential health benefits, but those with fewer employees were not.

The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) provides evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation to alcohol- and other drug-abusing persons and their families through its Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) treatment system. Medicare and Medicaid may cover some or all of the costs of some level of care.

In Illinois, addiction treatment services—including inpatient detox, rehab services, and continuing care—also are provided by the Addictions Treatment Program (ATP). It’s not free—it accepts Medicaid—but there is a sliding fee schedule based on ability to pay, and no one is turned away because they can’t pay.

Traveling to Chicago, Illinois Rehab Centers

There are only two large airports with scheduled flights within 25 miles of Chicago:

  • Chicago, Illinois, Midway International Airport (9.18 miles).
  • Chicago, Illinois, O’Hare International Airport (15.44 miles). Twice the connectivity of Midway.

There are two more large ones, though, without scheduled flights.

Land travel is provided through:

  • Chicago, Illinois, Union Station. The railroad hub of the Midwest, the third busiest station in the US, and the fourth busiest Amtrak station. Six out of 11 lines of northeastern Illinois commuter rail service Metra also begin and end at Union Station. Other transportation options from Union Station include:
    • Taxis
    • Rideshare
    • Bike Share (Divvy)
    • Parking
  • Chicago, Illinois, Transit Authority. The Chicago, Illinois, Transit Authority (CTA), including:
    • CTA ‘L’ train. Eight elevated train lines.
    • CTA Trains.
    • CTA Buses.
  • Greyhound. Intercity bus service from Union Station and its dedicated bus terminal.

Chicago, Illinois Addiction Treatment Resources

  • Chicago Recovery Alliance. A volunteer group providing harm reduction outreach services such as sterile syringes, testing of drugs, the opioid overdose reversal drug naloxone (Narcan)—and the training to use it— and harm reduction and drug abuse counseling.
  • Illinois Helpline for Opioids & Other Substances. 833-2FINDHELP, text 833234, or chat at helplineil.org. Trained professionals offer support, advice, and referrals.
  • Illinois Warm Line. 866a359a7953. A non-crisis phone service, staffed by Wellness Support Specialists (people who have personal experience of mental illness, substance abuse, or both), from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday (holidays excluded).

Additional national hotlines and resources include:

Sources

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  32. store.samhsa.gov – Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health – Full Report
  33. samhsa.gov – Approved Accreditation Bodies
  34. carf.org – CARF® accreditation focuses on quality, results
  35. coanet.org – Council on Accreditation
  36. jointcommission.org – The Joint Commission
  37. legitscript.com – Addiction Treatment Certification
  38. samhsa.gov – Who Can and Cannot Be a CCBHC?
  39. iaodapca.org – Illinois Certification Board, Inc.
  40. programs – Types of Treatment Programs (Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide, Third Edition)
  41. drugabuse.gov – Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction DrugFacts
  42. samhsa.gov – The Case for Screening and Treatment of Co-Occurring Disorders
  43. drugabuse.gov – Common Comorbidities with Substance Use Disorders Research Report Part 1: The Connection Between Substance Use Disorders and Mental Illness
  44. dhs.state.il.us – Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse – IDHS 4650
  45. rdhs.state.il.us – Recovery Residence Registry
  46. dhs.state.il.us – Office Locator
  47. sunshinebehavioralhealth.com – How to Choose an Inpatient Drug Rehab
  48. dhcs.ca.gov – Narcotic Treatment Programs (NTP)
  49. mayoclinic.org – Cognitive behavioral therapy
  50. depts.washington.edu – Dialectical Behavior Therapy
  51. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov – Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), Irrational and Rational Beliefs, and the Mental Health of Athletes
  52. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov – Motivational interviewing to improve treatment engagement and outcome in individuals seeking treatment for substance abuse: A multisite effectiveness study
  53. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov– Contingency management: what it is and why psychiatrists should want to use it
  54. encyclopedia.com – Matrix Model
  55. store.samhsa.gov – TIP 42: Substance Use Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders
  56. medlineplus.gov – Dual Diagnosis
  57. sunshinebehavioralhealth.com – A Guide to Improving Mental Health Through Mindfulness
  58. cabhp.asu.edu – Substance Abuse Aftercare Treatment: Continuum of Care
  59. chicagoaa.org – Chicago, Illinois AA: Area 19 Alcoholics Anonymous
  60. al-anon.org/al-anon-meetings/find-an-al-anon-meeting/ – Al-Anon Meetings
  61. al-anon.org – Al-Anon Electronic Meetings
  62. adultchildren.org – Adult Children of Alcoholics: Find Online Meetings
  63. chicagona.org – Chicagoland Region Narcotics Anonymous
  64. nar-anon.org – Nar-Anon Family Groups: Find a Meeting
  65. nar-anon.org – Nar-Anon Family Groups: Virtual Meetings
  66. Narateennar-anon.org/narateen – Nar-Anon Family Groups: Narateen FAQs
  67. illinoisareaca.org – Illinois Area of Cocaine Anonymous
  68. draonline.org – Dual Recovery Anonymous: Illinois
  69. marijuana-anonymous.org – Marijuana Anonymous: Find a Meeting
  70. locator.crgroups.info – Celebrate Recovery: A Christ-Centered Approach: Find a location near you
  71. crystalmeth.org – Crystal Meth Anonymous
  72. smartrecoverytest.org – SMART Recovery: Local meetings
  73. lifering.org – LifeRing: In-Person Meetings in the US
  74. lifering.org  – LifeRing: Online Meetings
  75. womenforsobriety.org – Women for Sobriety: Meeting Finder
  76. moderation.org – Moderation Management™ (MM) Phone Meetings
  77. moderation.org – Moderation Management™ (MM) Video Meetings
  78. palgroup.org – PAL National Online Meetings
  79. grasphelp.org – GRASP: Illinois Chapters & Meetings
  80. census.gov – QuickFact: Chicago, Illinois city, Illinois
  81. drugabuse.gov – Substance Use and Military Life DrugFacts
  82. va.gov – VA Locations:  Illinois
  83. chicago.va.gov – Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
  84. chicago.va.gov – Mental Health: Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
  85. ichicago.va.gov – Auburn Gresham VA Clinic: Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
  86. chicago.va.gov – Lakeside VA Clinic: Jesse Brown VA Medical Center
  87. va.gov – Vet Centers of Illinois
  88. chicagovets.org – Chicago, Illinois Department of Public Health
  89. chicago.gov/city/en/depts/cdph/supp_info/behavioral-health/veterans-and-mental-health.html – Veterans and Mental Health
  90. veteranscrisisline.net – Veterans Crisis Line
  91. mentalhealth.va.gov – Guide to VA Mental Health Services for Veterans & Families
  92. academy.chicagovets.org – VA Vet Centers
  93. usafacts.org – How do most Americans get their health insurance?
  94. medicare.gov – Mental health & substance use disorder services
  95. lakecountyil.gov – Addictions Treatment Program (ATP)
  96. airport.globefeed.com – Airport Near Chicago, IL, USA
  97. airport.globefeed.com – Chicago, Illinois Midway International Airport, US
  98. airport.globefeed.com – Chicago, Illinois O’Hare International Airport, US
  99. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station
  100. chicagounionstation.com  – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: About The Station
  101. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Taxis
  102. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Rideshare
  103. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Bike Share (Divvy)
  104. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Parking
  105. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Chicago, Illinois Transit Authority
  106. chicagounionstation.com – Chicago, Illinois Union Station: Travel: Greyhound
  107. npin.cdc.gov – Chicago, Illinois Recovery Alliance Positive Change
  108. helplineil.org – Illinois Helpline for Opioids & Other Substances
  109. dhs.state.il.us – Illinois Department of Human Services
  110. crisistextline.org – Crisis Textline
  111. suicidepreventionlifeline.org – National Suicide Prevention Lifeline]
  112. dhs.state.il.us – Illinois Department of Human Services: Screening, Assessments and Support Services, SASS
  113. samhsa.gov – SAMHSA’s National Helpline

Medical disclaimer:

Sunshine Behavioral Health strives to help people who are facing substance abuse, addiction, mental health disorders, or a combination of these conditions. It does this by providing compassionate care and evidence-based content that addresses health, treatment, and recovery.

Licensed medical professionals review material we publish on our site. The material is not a substitute for qualified medical diagnoses, treatment, or advice. It should not be used to replace the suggestions of your personal physician or other health care professionals.

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